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By Medifit Biologicals

 

SURROGATE MOTHER

surrogate mother 3

INTRODUCTION

Surrogacy is the practice in which a woman agrees to become pregnant with the intention of permanently surrendering the child born of that pregnancy to another person or couple, with the intent that the person or couple will parent the child.

The woman who bears the child is the ‘surrogate’ or ‘birth mother’.

The person or persons, to whom the child is intended to be surrendered, are referred to as ‘commissioning’ or ‘intended’ parents/persons.

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WHAT IS A SURROGATE MOTHER?

A surrogate mother is a woman who agrees to carry someone else’s baby. She becomes pregnant using some form of assisted reproductive technology, frequently IVF. The surrogate mother carries the baby to term and gives birth, and the baby is released from the hospital to its intended parents. Learn more about the two different types of surrogate mothers below.

 

A GESTATIONAL CARRIER

To be a surrogate, many surrogate mothers are gestational carriers. A gestational carrier becomes pregnant through IVF and gives birth to a baby that is not biologically related to her. Here’s how it works:

  • An embryo is created using either the intended parents’ or donor’s gametes (egg and sperm).
  • The surrogate mother’s eggs are not used.
  • The embryo is created using very specialized assisted reproductive technology.
  • One or more of these embryos is then transferred into the surrogate mother’s womb.
  • The surrogate mother becomes pregnant and is then released into the care of her own OBGYN to receive prenatal care and for delivery.
  • The surrogate mother gives birth with the love and support of the intended parents, and the intended parents go home with their bundle of joy!

 

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Depending on the law where the surrogacy arrangement takes place, commissioning persons may include:

  • heterosexual women who do not wish to carry a child by choice, or who are unable to carry a child due to a range of factors (for example, infertility; hysterectomy; disease (such as cancer); absent or poorly functioning ovaries or uterus; recurrent pregnancy loss; repeated failures using other forms of assisted reproduction; age);
  • single women or lesbian couples who cannot or do not wish to use artificial insemination or other forms of assisted reproduction to become pregnant, or do not wish to carry a pregnancy;
  • Single or same-sex partnered men.

In addition to the surrogate mother and commissioning persons, there may be numerous other people involved in (or affected by) such arrangements. For example, the surrogate mother’s partner, donors of ova and/or sperm and their partners, and any children already in existence related to the surrogate, the donors, the commissioning persons, and/or their partners. There may also be the involvement of agents, intermediaries, lawyers, clinicians and other associated staff.

Newborn sleeping child

TRADITIONAL SURROGACY

Unlike gestational surrogacy, a traditional surrogate is biologically related to the baby. Being a traditional surrogate is far less common as being a gestational carrier. Here’s how it works:

  • An embryo is created using either the intended father’s or donated sperm.
  • The surrogate mother’s eggs are used to create the embryo through IVF or artificial insemination.
  • The surrogate mother becomes pregnant and is then released into the care of her own OBGYN to receive prenatal care and for delivery.
  • The surrogate mother gives birth with the love and support of the intended parents and the intended parents go home with their bundle of joy!

 

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WHY ISN’T HER NAME ON THE BIRTH CERTIFICATE?

Many people ask us why the surrogate mother’s name isn’t on the baby’s birth certificate. After all, she gave birth at the hospital! How does the hospital know whose names to put on the birth certificate? Here’s how it works:

  • When the surrogate mother is about 4-5 months pregnant, the intended parents will begin the legal work necessary to have their names put on the baby’s birth certificate.
  • The surrogate mother and her spouse/partner, if she has one, and the intended parents will sign court documents asking a judge to issue an order. This order will tell the hospital to put the intended parents’ names on the birth certificate, not the surrogate mother’s.
  • The judge’s order will also tell the hospital to release the baby to the intended parents, not the surrogate mother.
  • The intended parents and surrogate mother bring this order with them to the hospital on delivery day to make sure the birth clerk completes the birth certificate correctly and the baby is released to its intended parents.

 

SURROGATE MOTHER REQUIREMENTS

What are Circle Surrogacy’s requirements for surrogates?

Successful surrogate applicants:

  • Have delivered a child of their own
  • Are between the ages of 21-41 years of age
  • Do not participate in certain government aid programs including cash assistance, welfare, public housing or section 8
  • Typically have a Body Mass Index (BMI) of no higher than 33. (In some instances, BMI between 33-35 is acceptable.) Calculate My BMI.
  • Live in a surrogate-friendly state in the United States (we are very sorry but we cannot accept gestational carriers who reside in Washington, D.C., Washington, Nebraska, Louisiana, Michigan, New York, New Jersey)
  • Have the support of family and friends
  • Do not use illegal drugs, smoke cigarettes, or abuse alcohol
  • Women with IUDs, contraceptive implants, or who have had the Depo Provera shot are welcome to apply but must be willing to have their IUDs removed before a transfer, and should understand that they may be placed on hold temporarily. We are not able to accept women who have had the Essure procedure.

 

WHO USES SURROGATES?

A woman might decide to use a surrogate for several reasons:

 

  • She may have medical problems with her uterus.
  • She may have had a hysterectomy that removed her uterus.
  • There may be conditions that make pregnancy impossible or medically risky, such as severe heart disease.

Other women choose surrogacy after trying unsuccessfully to get pregnant with a variety of assisted-reproduction techniques (ART), such as IVF.

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Surrogates have also made parenthood an option for people who might not be able to adopt a child. Reasons could include:

  • Their age
  • Their marital status
  • Their sexual orientation

For instance, when gay men use a traditional surrogate, one of them uses his sperm to fertilize the surrogate’s egg through artificial insemination. The surrogate then carries the baby and gives birth. A gay couple might also choose an egg donor, fertilize that donated egg, and have the resulting embryo implanted in a gestational surrogate to carry until birth.

 

 

 

 

By Medifit Biologicals

www.medifitbiologicals.com