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By Medifit Biologicals

BLOOD SUGAR LEVEL TEST

BLOOD SUGAR LEVEL TEST 3

INTRODUCTION

A blood glucose test measures the amount of a type of sugar, called glucose, in your blood. Glucose comes from carbohydrate foods. It is the main source of energy used by the body. Insulin is a hormone that helps your body’s cells uses the glucose. Insulin is produced in the pancreas and released into the blood when the amount of glucose in the blood rises.

Normally, your blood glucose levels increase slightly after you eat. This increase causes your pancreas to release insulin so that your blood glucose levels do not get too high. Blood glucose levels that remain high over time can damage your eyes, kidneys, nerves, and blood vessels.

 

IMPORTANT FACTS ABOUT BLOOD SUGAR

Glucose is a simple sugar and is one of the primary molecules which serve as energy sources for both plants and animals.

Insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, helps maintain normal blood sugar levels.

Uncontrolled or high blood sugar levels can lead to health complications such as blindness, heart disease, kidney disease.

Increase in concentration of glucose in the blood leads to a condition called “diabetic coma” or hyperglycemia.

 

NORMAL VALUES OF SUGAR LEVELS IN BLOOD

 

Fasting Blood Sugar Level:

  • 4 to 6 mmol/l (70-110 mg/dl).

 

Post prandial (PP) Blood Sugar Level:

  •  Less than 10 mmol/l (<180 mg/dl).

 

SEVERAL DIFFERENT TYPES OF BLOOD GLUCOSE TESTS

  • Fasting blood sugar (FBS) measures blood glucose after you have not eaten for at least 8 hours. It is often the first test done to check for prediabetes and diabetes.
  • 2-hour postprandial blood sugar measures blood glucose exactly 2 hours after you start eating a meal. This is not a test used to diagnose diabetes. This test is used to see if someone with diabetes is taking the right amount of insulin with meals.
  • Random blood sugar (RBS) measures blood glucose regardless of when you last ate. Several random measurements may be taken throughout the day. Random testing is useful because glucose levels in healthy people do not vary widely throughout the day. Blood glucose levels that vary widely may mean a problem. This test is also called a casual blood glucose test.
  • Oral glucose tolerance test is used to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes. An oral glucose tolerance test is a series of blood glucose measurements taken after you drink a sweet liquid that contains glucose. This test is commonly used to diagnose diabetes that occurs during pregnancy (gestational diabetes). Women who had high blood sugar levels during pregnancy may have oral glucose tolerance tests after pregnancy.
  • Hemoglobin A1c, or glycohemoglobin, measures how much sugar (glucose) is stuck to red blood cells. This test can be used to diagnose diabetes. It also shows how well your diabetes has been controlled in the past 2 to 3 months and whether your diabetes medicine needs to be changed. The result of your A1c test can be used to estimate your average blood sugar level. This is called your estimated average glucose, or eAG.

 BLOOD SUGAR LEVEL TEST 4

WHEN TO TEST BLOOD SUGAR

Routine or daily testing

Timing your routine or daily testing as recommended can help you see how your meals, medications and activities affect your blood sugar. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that you routinely test blood sugar levels as an effective part of any self-care program. For people using insulin, the ADA recommends testing 3 or more times a day. If you take another kind of medication, test your blood sugar level as often as your healthcare team recommends. Your logbook is a good way to keep track of routine testing results.

You and your healthcare team will determine when you should test your blood sugar based on your current health, age and level of activity, as well as the time of day and other factors. They may suggest that you test your blood sugar at any of the following times:

 

Before each meal

  • 1 or 2 hours after a meal
  • Before a bedtime snack
  • In the middle of the night
  • Before physical activity, to see if you need a snack
  • During and after physical activity
  • If you think your blood sugar might be too high or too low, or falling
  • When you’re sick or under stress

 

STRUCTURED TESTING

In addition to your routine or daily testing schedule, you may want to consider testing your blood sugar levels in a structured way if you:

  • Adjust your insulin or oral medication
  • Begin a new medication unrelated to diabetes
  • Change your activity program, meal plan, work or school schedule

Short-term structured testing supports your routine or daily testing by having you check your blood sugar before and after the things you do. It can help you determine if you’re in a safe range and to problem-solve around how the things you do are connected to your blood sugar. Use these tools to make changes one step at a time, instead of trying to change everything at once.

Take your completed tool to your next appointment so your healthcare professional can help you fine-tune your diabetes management.

Combining routine blood sugar testing and structured testing gives you a better view and a clearer picture of how your self-care program is working. You can then take one step at a time toward your goals to enjoy a longer, healthier life.

 BLOOD SUGAR LEVEL TEST 2

RECOMMENDED BLOOD SUGAR TARGETS

 

For people with type 1 diabetes, the American Diabetes Association recommends the following blood sugar targets. Talk to your doctor and diabetes educator about these goals.

 

Before meals, your blood sugar should be:

  • From 90 – 130 mg/dl for adults
  • From 90 – 130 mg/dl for children 13 – 19 years old
  • From 90 – 180 mg/dl for children 6 – 12 years old
  • From 100 – 180 mg/dl for children under 6 years old

 

After meals (1 – 2 hours after eating), your blood sugar should be:

  • Less than 180 mg/dl for adults

 

At bedtime, your blood sugar should be:

  • From 90 – 150 mg/dl for adults
  • From 90 – 150 mg/dl for children 13 – 19 years old
  • From 100 – 180 mg/dl for children 6 – 12 years old
  • From 110 – 200 mg/dl for children under 6 years old

 

For people with type 2 diabetes, the American Diabetes Association recommends the following blood sugar targets. Talk to your doctor and diabetes educator about these goals.

 

Before meals, your blood sugar should be:

  • From 70 – 130 mg/dl for adults
  • After meals (1 – 2 hours after eating), your blood sugar should be:
  • Less than 180 mg/dl for adults

BLOOD SUGAR LEVEL TEST 1

By Medifit Biologicals

www.medifitbiologicals.com